Posts Tagged ‘ Fearrington ’

From the John Edwards Scandal, Lessons on the Temptations and Pitfalls of Political Life

October 2, 2009
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Thinking of my piece in Slate/Double X on Ted Kennedy growing into a "feminist icon" and the discussion about it that has ensued among friends on Facebook, one thing I bet both my Democratic and Republican friends can agree on is that in retrospect, Kennedy was not the cad or the betrayer of feminist values in his marriage to Vicki that John Edwards, who once aspired to be a feminist champion, now appears to be in his marriage to Elizabeth. John and Elizabeth Edwards made a rare joint appearance in public at Ted Kennedy's funeral, and expressed their admiration...

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Newsweek.com Publishes ‘My Turn’ Piece on Late-Term Abortion

June 17, 2009
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"The Case For Legal Late-Term Abortions," by Jim Buie, Newsweek.com "Abortion wasn't an option for my parents, but raising my severely retarded brother nearly destroyed our family." It is sparking interesting comments. I wrote the piece not so much to advocate for late-term abortion but because I think the public debate has lacked realism. Few people seem to understand the personal and societal price to be paid when choice -- even late-term choice -- is eliminated. In the United States, only Kansas allows doctors to abort fetuses after 20 weeks. If you believe late-term abortion should be illegal, then...

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View From My Window: Fox in Second Frame

June 7, 2009
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View From My Window: Fox in Second Frame

Saturday my wife and I spied a small gray fox in our yard in Fearrington Village, between Chapel Hill and Pittsboro, NC. Our son later discovered a mother fox and baby foxes in a drainage pipe. We frequently see cardinals, hummingbirds and titmouse at the bird feeder. Click on either photo to enlarge them. (I apologize for the quality of these pictures -- I was using a cell phone camera.)

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As Vestiges of Segregation Endure, Documentaries Help to Confront Racism, Bring Racial Healing

May 24, 2009
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Shockingly, in some parts of the South, segregated high school proms are still being held. The New York Times spotlights segregated prom nights in Mount Vernon, Ga. Despite the old reputation of Southerners as more bigoted than the rest of the nation, in my own experience and observation, many Southerners are more liberated from the shackles of racism than people from other regions because they have had to CONSCIOUSLY and deliberately BREAK from what were once Southern social norms. Several white Southerners have told me recently that they felt they were rebelling against the teachings of their parents and...

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Garrison Keillor, Prairie Home Companion in Durham, NC and Gross Jokes About Pizza

May 11, 2009
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I missed a chunk of the live broadcast of Prairie Home Companion in Durham, NC, so I'm gratified to find a podcast online. Listen to the full broadcast, complete with jokes about the region's overly polite people, its tobacco history, barbecue, lush green trees and green grass, and the rivalries between Duke, UNC, and NC State. Meanwhile, Keillor recently wrote a funny column about two quite foolish Domino's Pizza employees in Conover, NC who posted a nasty practical joke to Youtube that caused a national sensation. He concludes: "I call on all Americans to stand up for the Conover...

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Chatham County in Better Financial Shape Than Most Surrounding Counties, Lucier Says

March 23, 2009
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It is illuminating to read Chatham County (NC) Board of Commissioners' Chair George Lucier's State of the County Address, complete with color graphs. I'm new to local civic life in the county, and I learned that Chatham is in far better financial shape than other nearby counties. I couldn't find any coverage of this important address in The News and Observer, the Chatham Journal, or other local media outlets I searched on Google, so I've decided to summarize it myself for my own edification and that of readers. For FY2009, Chatham is projecting a relatively tiny .24% budget shortfall,...

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‘Organizing for America’: Obama Network in Chatham County, NC Plans Continued Activities

January 18, 2009
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Ken Boggs, Democratic chairman of Mann's Chapel precinct in Chatham County, NC, heard a frequent complaint from voters during the 2008 election: "The only time I hear from the Democratic Party is at election time when they are seeking my vote." Ken thought this complaint from voters was understandable. In the era of mass media (radio, television, direct mail) and campaign "air wars" --dominated by negative campaign ads -- traditional political strategists viewed voters as impersonal demographic targets, to be sold a message that has been test-marketed by focus groups but has nothing to do with listening to individual...

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First Post-Election Chatham County Obama ‘Change Is Coming’ House Party Held

December 19, 2008
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At my home in North Chatham County, NC, I hosted one of the 10,000 Obama house parties held across the country in mid-December. Thanks to the powerful tools at http://my.barackobama.com, local Democratic Party email lists and a neighborhood online bulletin board, in just a few days the word was spread. I received 24 RSVPs, and 11 regrets. That's a great response for a rural county AFTER the election. I was encouraged that more than 20 people showed up. There was a lot of energy in the room -- people seem eager to bring change not only on the national...

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Central NC to Grow Exponentially, Gain 40,000 New Residents By 2013

December 8, 2008
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Here's some good news that has so far mostly been ignored by major North Carolina media: parts of the state may be insulated from the national recession as it receives a huge economic stimulus. Not enough media attention has been paid to the huge influx of more than 40,000 soldiers, civilians, contractors and their dependents to central North Carolina by 2013 as Ft. Bragg receives commands resulting from Base Realignment and Closing decisions. As many as 20,000 could arrive by fall 2011. The NC Military Foundation estimates the economic impact on the state will be upwards of one billion...

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Happiness is Contagious and Spreads in Social Networks

December 6, 2008
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Fascinating report from NPR. http://tinyurl.com/5pjlxhThen again, maybe happiness isn't contagious. Maybe "researchers can too easily draw false conclusions about contagion." More. Previously, I wrote "How to Define Happiness?"

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Blogging’s Spiritual and Possibly Even Financial Rewards, in Contrast to Deteriorating Conventional Journalism

December 4, 2008
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Despite all the horrendous stories of newspaper layoffs, near bankruptcies, and even "bailout plans for journalists," there's some silver lining in the media world: blogging is blooming into a profitable financial and publishing enterprise for at least a few. The Huffington Post, which had 4.5 million unique visitors in September, just landed $25 million of new funding. It plans focused acquisitions, and currently has a valuation of $100 million. TPM Media, founded by Talking Points Memo blogger Josh Marshall, which has about a dozen employees, is hoping to expand in 2009 through micro-targeted advertising.And despite the decline of traditional...

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Facebook for Geezers (Old Folks). And What If Facebook Existed During the Civil War?

December 2, 2008
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Facebook for Geezers (Old Folks). And What If Facebook Existed During the Civil War?

Stephen Wildish designed this clever parody of Facebook: Pensionbook. (Click on the image to enlarge). And what if Facebook had existed during the Civil War? Click to find out.Discuss: Older Generation on Facebook

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Frank Dascenzo: 39 Memories From 39 Years as a Sports Writer in Durham

October 24, 2008
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"It's not easy to say goodbye, but it's time. Thirty-nine years flew by so fast that trying to figure out what is the highlight of it became next to impossible. Well, there were those 26 trips to the Final Four. And that Duke-Kentucky game in 1992, which came a year after that Duke-UNLV game. Both came after a famous shot by a famous player in 1982, which came a year before a famous coach was seen in New Mexico, running across the court looking for somebody to hug. Yes, fabulous moments. Geez, has it really been this long?" Read...

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Hope for Newspapers’ Financial Recovery in Subscriber-based Online Communities?

September 19, 2008
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The Wall Street Journal has launched a new social network and online community for its one million paid subscribers. "If if it’s successful, it could provide lessons for other news organizations trying to build deeper connections with their readers," observes The New York Times. I hope it works, because that would also offer hope for a paid subscription model to online publications. It's great to read this quote from Alan Murray, deputy editor of the WSJ:"The Wall Street Journal under its new management (News Corp) is investing in both print and online, so I would say we are very...

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Eva & Dan

September 15, 2008
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Eva & Dan

September 14, 2008 Eva & Dan I had the pleasure of photographing Eva and Dan this past Saturday at Fearrington Village here in Pittsboro, NC with Steve Exum. The scenery at Fearrington is lovely which complemented this couple’s disposition. I have been photographing weddings all summer, but I’ve only put a few up here. I’ll have to post a conglomeration of my favorite photos as a recap later on this blog so you can all see what has been keeping me so busy!

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Optimists Vs. Pessimists On How Internet is Changing Society

September 10, 2008
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Fascinating evaluation of recent books and articles. Which side do you think makes the more compelling case? Related: Internet Takes Us Back to the Future A Political Reawakening: Internet Takes Us Back to the Future

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Pam Cash-Roper of Pittsboro, NC, a Republican, Spoke at the Democratic Convention and Explained Why She’s Voting for Obama

September 5, 2008
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In prime time, five "regular" Americans spoke at the Democratic Convention. By far the best of the five, in my humble opinion, was Pamela Cash-Roper, a retired nurse from Chatham County, Pittsboro, NC. (And I'm not just saying that because I'm a resident of Chatham County.)The N&O did a nice story. Below, courtesy of the Chatham Journal, she talks about the response in Chatham County to her high national profile: More Republicans for Obama.

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Meeting Clyde Edgerton

August 16, 2008
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Author Clyde Edgerton in The News and Observer: "The New South is everywhere, but you can also find the Old South, physically, depending on how far you get off the interstate. And the old South, whatever that is, still exists in some form or another, for better or worse, in the psyche of more than one human being." One aspect of the Old South is innocence, naivete. I spent a delightful morning at McIntyre's Bookstore in Fearrington Village listening to Clyde Edgerton read from his latest comic novel, The Bible Salesman, and singing songs with his bango. I particularly...

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John Edwards Learns (Painfully): You Can Run, But in the Age of the Internet, You CANNOT Hide

August 11, 2008
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The John Edwards "scandal" illuminates new perspectives on media: I confess that when the scandal broke in the National Enquirer, I went online and started googling the alleged participants. I learned that Bob McGovern, the man the Enquirer said drove Edwards to meet Rielle Hunter, was a psychic and "spiritual healer" in Santa Barbara, and that Rielle Hunter was seriously into New Age spirituality, and was described by novelist Jay Mcinerney when she was 20-something as "sexually voracious, cocaine-addled." Though McGovern and Hunter had obviously tried to take information about themselves off the Internet, it was still available in...

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Secret Cold War Bunker Near Fearrington No Longer Secret, No Longer Operational

August 11, 2008
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When I first learned about the secret cold war bunker next to Fearrington Village off of Big Hole Road while walking my dog, I and my neighbors joked that we had discovered the "undisclosed location" that Vice President Dick Cheney was holed up in after 9/11. And/or the spot from which the U.S. Army was launching and testing flying saucers. Now we learn from the News and Observer that the bunker, built in the early 1960s to protect the nation's leaders in the event of nuclear attack from the Soviets, has been shut down.

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